202 Flares 202 Flares ×

Today, March 8, is International Women’s Day. It is, quite literally, a day to celebrate being a women. I’ve already received a few Facebook messages congratulating me. As if I had something to do with determining my sex.

Even though I have some mixed feelings on a day celebrating women (I mean, shouldn’t we be singing ourselves praises and celebrating our awesomeness EVERY day?), I cannot deny the fact that being a female impacts my life — especially as a traveler.

If the recent #WeGoSolo movement is any indication, female travel is definitely popular and definitely a hot topic right now. Women are traveling solo, with significant others, and in groups all across the world.

Balmy Alley, San Francisco

So, in honor of the “holiday” today, I thought I would look at some of the reasons why traveling as a female rocks — and also why it kind of sucks sometimes (and yes, some of these ARE tongue-in-cheek, so please don’t take me TOO seriously…)

Gender Stereotypes

Yes, they exist, and will likely continue to exist no matter how large of strides women make. Women are supposed to take on certain roles, have certain types of personalities, and be capable (or incapable) of certain things. I’m not saying I agree with these stereotypes, of course, but there’s no denying that they are there.

Pro: The positive to these stereotypes? Well, as a solo female traveler, you are much more likely to find a nice person (male OR female) willing to help stow a bag on the train, give you directions, or simply sit and chat for a while. Traveling as a women (and especially solo) often means that people are looking out for you, no matter where you are in the world, and that is encouraging.

Con: The downside, of course, is the reason behind people looking out for you — the fact that women are very often viewed as being weak and incapable and in NEED of looking after. These gender stereotypes can also lead to some uncomfortable situations on the road, such as in cultures where women traveling solo is frowned upon, or in cultures where women are supposed to be wives and not much more. In some extreme cases, women can also be the target of unwanted attention, advances, and even violence simply because of our gender. The fact that women have to be more vigilant than men while traveling kind of sucks.

Monument Valley, Utah

 

Body Image/Beauty

This applies to men somewhat, too, but especially to women. Mostly in Western cultures, there is a very clear image of what women should “ideally” look like.

Pro: In countries other than America, body image isn’t such an issue. Yes, women are still concerned with diets and their figures, but they are much more comfortable with showing off what they’ve got (I mean, have you BEEN to a spa in Europe, ladies??). While traveling, therefore, I’ve found it much easier to embrace the body I have instead of obsessing over the one that I’d like to have. As far as body image goes, travel has given me more confidence — I don’t feel pressured to fix my hair or wear tons of makeup or dress up when I’m on the road, which has led to me becoming much more comfortable in my own skin.

Con: Once you start caring less about your appearance and loving your body, you may decide you want to show it off more. This is definitely frowned upon in certain cultures, however, and it can be tricky sometimes to balance your confidence with what is culturally acceptable. Plus, heading back home to where things like wearing makeup, pants, and real shoes are expected could end up being a bit of a culture shock!

Belize

 

Re-Invention of Self

In America especially, there is a clearly defined path that we are supposed to follow (and supposed to WANT to follow) as women. We’re supposed to go to school, get married, and then pop out babies.

Pro: When you travel and have your eyes opened to the world, you may realize that the clearly defined path from back home is bullshit. You CAN break away from the pack, and traveling can help you re-invent yourself. Especially if you’re moving around frequently and meeting new people all the time, traveling offers up the perfect opportunity to let your guard down and let your true personality shine through. There’s nothing stopping you from being the type of woman that YOU want to be on the road, instead of the one that society says you should be.

Con: Is there really a downside to discovering yourself? Well, perhaps. If you change a lot on your travels, there’s always the danger that people won’t recognize you when you come home. You may have to use your new personality to make new friends when your travels are over, because you very well might have outgrown your old ones.

Skydeck, Chicago

 

Sex

Yup, I’m going to talk about it, because it’s a part of life and it’s often also a part of traveling. (I mean, come on ladies, we all have a fantasy that includes a tryst with a dark and mysterious foreign man, right?)

Pro: I feel like when you’re traveling, the people you meet judge you less. You all share a similar outlook on life and sense of adventure — and that adventure often spills over into the bedroom. Go ahead, be a little adventurous when you’re traveling (while still being safe, of course!). Kiss that stranger in a bar. Dance with that cute guy whose name you can’t pronounce. Perhaps even have that fling with that dark and mysterious foreign man.

Con: We women unfortunately get a raw deal when it comes to sex and traveling. It IS slightly more dangerous for women to sleep around on the road. Along with the possibility of contracting STDs and other nasty things, there’s always the big P word. You do NOT want to come home with a baby bump as a souvenir… We women also have to worry about things like birth control and menstrual cycles and other annoying details that can often detract from the overall experience. Which SUCKS.

And of course there’s also the possibility of actually falling for that boy at the bar or that mysterious foreign man, which can make goodbyes incredibly painful (because, let’s face it, we females ARE usually the ones more at risk for this happening…).

Chicago

 

Confidence-building

At the end of the day, I think most of the above things listed lead to one thing: confidence. Which is always sexy on a women if you ask me.

Pro: Travel (and especially solo travel) is great for building confidence in yourself and your ability to survive on your own. You’ll become more confident, more self-sufficient, and basically just more badass. You’ll challenge yourself, overcome fears, and become a better you. It’s one of the BEST things about traveling, in my opinion.

Con: Not gonna lie, though… thanks to those gender stereotypes I mentioned before, it IS sometimes more difficult to find a significant other when you’re a confident, empowered women who has seen the world. Which is lame. A lot of men definitely get intimidated by women they see as being more successful than they are, and I speak from experience when I say that being worldly and confident CAN make it tougher to find a mate. (Though, in reality, would awesome women like us really WANT to be with guys who are intimidated by the fact that we’ve traveled the world and rocked it? Probably not.)

Keystone, Colorado

 

Yes, there are pros AND cons to traveling as a female. But it wouldn’t be as exciting or challenging otherwise. And, in my opinion, the pros far outweigh the cons.

So happy International Women’s Day, ladies. Keep traveling the world and being awesome.

——

Can you think of any other reasons why traveling as a female rocks (or sucks)?

 

 

Opt In Image
Did you enjoy this article?
Subscribe for updates!

Sign up for my FREE monthly newsletter to get plenty more updates, photos, tips, and adventurous stories delivered to your inbox each month!

No spam, I promise.

Share →
Buffer

48 Responses to Why Traveling as a Female Rocks (and Why it Sucks)

  1. Alouise says:

    I had no idea today was International Women’s Day. In some ways I’d like to travel without the gender stereotypes as a woman, but then again there gender stereotypes about men too. I think the most important thing is for women to get out and travel, whether they’re on their own or in a group, and to encourage other women to travel as well.
    Alouise recently posted..Road Trip Memories 20 – Crossing The Confederation Bridge

  2. Gaelyn says:

    I’ve met many more solo female travelers in South Africa than males, pairs or couples. I wouldn’t want to be anyone but me. Even met an interesting man at a Backpackers yet nothing more than good conversation happened and that’s just fine.
    Gaelyn recently posted..Hogsback, the land of Hobbits in South Africa

  3. Sam says:

    Interesting post! However, I totally agree that it’s a bit weird to have a day celebrating women. It’s kind of patronising!
    Sam recently posted..Food Porn Friday: Covita, Bariloche

    • DangerousBiz says:

      Yeah, just a tad. Though I know it’s done with good intentions in mind.

    • Just One Boomer (Suzanne) says:

      I don’t feel patronized and it helps us remember our sisters all over the world where being born female is viewed as a curse. My personal Facebook photo isn’t of me. I changed it to one of Malala, the day she was shot in the head on her school bus at age 15 for advocating for the right of girls to an education in Pakistan.

  4. Jaclyn says:

    I really like what you said about how with travel you can break away from the pack and reinvent yourself (or at least what society thinks you should be). I have been traveling solo for work all over the U.S for 3 years and it has definitely made me more confident. The Pros definitely out weight the cons. Go Women! lol
    Jaclyn recently posted..Weekly Wanderlust: Grand Canyon, Arizona

    • DangerousBiz says:

      The confidence boost you get from traveling really is fantastic, isn’t it? It’s one of the (many) great things to come from travel.

  5. Rob says:

    Good article. Without being critical, though, I’ll point out that the whole “reinvent yourself and come home a different person” is not a gender specific problem. Happens to me all the time. I’ve ended up with fewer friends, but they’re all adaptable :)

    And as for the whole “falling for someone” .. It’s certainly happened to me. :)

    • DangerousBiz says:

      Oh yeah, the re-invention is definitely not gender specific! In fact, pretty much all of these can apply to men as well as women. But, since I’m a female, I can really only write about all of it from my gender’s perspective!

  6. Rob says:

    And I forgot to mention that there are a *lot* of solo female travelers in NZ right now. Lots of guys, too, of course. And lots, oddly, of (un?)lucky German guys who seem to be traveling with 2 or 3 women.

  7. Franca says:

    This is an interesting reading for me. I am a traveler myself but as part of a couple that’s why I can only imagine how it’s to travel solo for a lady.
    A lot of the points you mentioned like the re-Invention of yourself happens to me too, I guess that happens to everybody no matter if traveling solo or not. :)
    Franca recently posted..6 Months Travel Anniversary – Now What?

  8. Well written and well said – especially the sex and falling for someone part. That is SO hard on the road!
    Kristin Addis recently posted..Free as Anything in Melbourne

  9. zoomingjapan says:

    I didn’t know it was “International Women’s Day”. I doubt it’s celebrated at all here in Japan where I live.

    I found this blog entry really interesting. I’m not a global traveller, but a traveller within Japan.

    I’m surprised to hear that people in America don’t care too much about their looks? I was the impression that there are two extreme groups: those who eat too much and are really fat and those who care far too much about their looks?

    It’s interesting to see that the idea of “beauty” is different in other cultures!
    Here in Japan, being pale, almost white is considered to be very beautiful. Women use creams with whitener and in summer try to avoid the sun as much as possible. Having a tan isn’t considered to be beautiful.

    Thanks for sharing your experience and honest opinion! :)

    • DangerousBiz says:

      No, people in America definitely DO care about their looks! Much moreso than in some other countries I’ve visited. Though you’re right that images of beauty are very different in different cultures!

  10. Liz says:

    Fantastic Amanda, I am so happy you addressed all of these feelings and issues women face when traveling. Not that many people talk about it openly, especially the sexy times part lol.

    I totally agree, I feel like a lot of guys are afraid of empowered confident women, it’s baffling. Sometimes I feel like I would have a lot more luck in the romance department if I stayed at home and had a more “normal” life, which SUCKS.

    Anyways, thanks for this :)
    Liz recently posted..Getting Naked in Istanbul

    • DangerousBiz says:

      TOTALLY agree with you, Liz. I meet guys here in Ohio who are perfectly nice, but they’re clearly intimidated by me and what I’m doing with my life. It REALLY sucks. But I’m not willing to sacrifice doing what I love just so I can have a guy in my life. Who needs ‘em!

      Glad you liked the post!

  11. Corinne says:

    Great points! I applaud all of you solo travelers! I definitely think women have it a little harder then men when traveling, and I’m often reminded of this when JIm and I are on the road. However, it is no reason to not do it. Travel on!

    • DangerousBiz says:

      Women do have a bit of a tougher time, it’s true. But that’s certainly doesn’t stop a lot of us from traveling!!

  12. Katherina says:

    I couldn’t agree more with you, Amanda. Traveling makes us more interesting, worldly, builds confidence and character. It goes for both, though – women and men as well. I can’t picture myself with someone who hasn’t got that curiosity and hunger for the World!
    Katherina recently posted..Photo Essay: Hiking from Seaford to Eastbourne – The Seven Sisters

  13. Sofie says:

    I actually didn’t give much thought to International Women’s Day. I saw all the tweets appear on twitter, but as I had a really busy day on Friday, I have to admit I didn’t stop and think about it’s meaning. Then I saw an image on Facebook. Posted by someone with good intention, I’m sure, who just wanted to wish all the women a happy Women’s Day. The image was an adaptation of the evolution image you often see, of apes growing to humans. In this image, however, you saw a baby rowing up to be a girl, a teenager, a young woman, a young pregnant woman, a woman with a baby, and an old woman.
    As if womanhood is automatically linked to motherhood.
    As if all we can do, are made to do, is grow up to give birth.
    Again, I know this image wasn’t intended this way. But it came over this way. I felt insulted and frustrated because I myself don’t want children. I don’t have anything against motherhood. I just don’t want it for myself. his is an entirely different discussion, but I just wanted to mention it here because I already have to explain myself to everyone when the subject comes on and now I feel like I also have to defend myself on, of all days, International Women’s Day.
    Sofie recently posted..Sunday Supers

    • DangerousBiz says:

      I totally understand where you’re coming from, Sophie. Your frustration isn’t unfounded! For all the “strides” we’re supposed to have made as women in this society, I see/hear things all too often that would suggest that we still have a long way to go.

  14. Monica says:

    I can’t believe how many people (men and women) were talking about International Women’s Day this year. I don’t know if I missed it last year but or maybe it’s the travel community talking more about women travelling solo and having the confidence to get out there and see the world.

    I definitely think that travelling as a woman is that little bit harder but I agree that people are more willing to help a woman out. A friend of mine fainted in Bangkok a couple of weeks ago and it turned out she was really sick with Dengue fever. A Thai lady who was a complete stranger helped my friend up, took her back to her house and cared for her for 3 days before she was well enough to leave. I don’t think the lady would have taken her in if she were a man.
    Monica recently posted..Petting leopards at Moholoholo Rehabilitation Park in South Africa

    • DangerousBiz says:

      Wow what a story! But yes, I agree that that might not have happened if she’d been a man.

      I noticed a lot more talk about International Women’s Day this year, too. I think it helped that female solo travel is such a hot topic at the moment.

  15. Violeta says:

    I never traveled solo for more than a few days at a time, but I felt local people were indeed more willing to help me than when I traveled with a group. I intend to do more solo travels in the future, because I noticed I tend to get in touch with people more than when traveling as a couple.
    Violeta recently posted..McDonald’s Advert, Country Style

    • DangerousBiz says:

      It’s true that you’re more likely to meet other travelers when you’re traveling solo – especially other solo travelers!

  16. Sammi says:

    I love this post, sooo much the pro’s and cons hit all the right nails on the head totally.

  17. Cherina says:

    I agree with you that it’s a little weird to have *one* day a year to celebrate women. We are pretty awesome year round, right? ;)
    I love your post though and as I’m sure most other solo travelers will, I can totally relate to most of it. It also had me laughing out loud a few times, especially the references to dark and mysterious foreign men – interesting how the men at ‘home’ never seem match that description ;)
    Cherina recently posted..Hiking in Alaska: Lion’s Head, Glacier View

  18. [...] And this made me so frustrated and sad. Why oh why does womanhood have to be linked to motherhood? Someone who wanted to celebrate Women’s Day actually thought this was a good way to do it. By diminishing the role of women to growing up, giving birth and growing old. I know this image wasn’t meant this way. I know the one who posted it had good intentions. But, I’m sorry, they failed. Sorry, I needed to get this off of my chest. I’ll stop ranting now and, as this is Sunday Supers, share with you a post by Amanda from A Dangerous Business that nicely sums up some pro’s and cons about traveling as a woman. [...]

  19. Kay says:

    Jings Amanda, I can relate to soooooo much of this.

    I definitely opt for a somewhat hippy appearance when I’m travelling and always find it such a struggle and a chore to paint my face again and coordinate my outfits properly on my return home (the damn cold weather makes the skin on my face patchy red!).

    I also find it difficult to relate to people, and their lack of ambition, when I return. I guess meeting interesting people all the time sort of spoils you, and I just don’t feel stimulated by conversations about the ‘same old’ all the time.

    And as for the opposite sex… WELL! I have recently parted ways with someone who would verbally abuse me when drunk about the fact “I run away overseas” and am “obviously lost” SAY WHAT?! Coming from someone who has only ventured out of Scotland once in 10 years. Hmmmm. He later revealed he had a complex about his lack of achievements in comparison to mine…

    So then we’re left with fellow travellers and worldwide wanderers, who we fall for too quickly in romantic, foreign surroundings and then have to ‘love and leave’ just as quick.

    Travelling is awesome, and so is being a female but I’m glad you pointed out both the positives and negatives when the two are combined.

    Thanks Amanda, really enjoyed that bedtime read :-)

    • DangerousBiz says:

      Glad you can relate, Kay! At the end of the day, I obviously think the positives far outweigh the negatives. But there definitely ARE some things that suck about being a worldly, traveling woman sometimes!

  20. Isuann says:

    Hi, I’m really glad to have stumbled upon your blog. Greetings from Malaysia :) I definitely agree with what you said.

    Last year I travelled alone for the first time (to Vienna), and realised that it was so much easier to meet new people than when in a group. The only tiny problem was that it was a bit inconvenient to have to ask people to take photos of me… Can’t wait for my next solo trip to Europe!

    • DangerousBiz says:

      Haha, yes, getting photos of yourself is tough when you’re traveling solo! But I’m glad to hear you had such a good time.

  21. Ria Dancel says:

    Travelling as a female, I think, brings more advantages :) For one,using our charisma when in places of strict traffic rules, as smile at the police officer usually works, hehehe :) Another could be, as a female, I have experienced being prioritized in queues at train or bus stations :) So far, I have never had any “sucking” experience as a woman traveler ;) Lucky me, I guess.
    Ria Dancel recently posted..Maria’s Edge Resort

  22. […] Travelling solo means that I usually have plenty of time to reflect – and plenty of time to perfect my listening skills. But listening doesn’t always apply to other people. I have learned to “listen” to the places I visit, too – because there often is more to a destination than initially meets the eye. This has led to me falling in love with some pretty unexpected places. […]

  23. Love this post! Lots of awesome points! As someone who recently returned from the Middle East on business (UAE, Qatar, Oman), I really thought a lot about women, our place in society and the cultural differences as it pertains to women around the world. It makes me angry that I even have to think of safety etc, but at the same time, traveling makes me feel empowered, and educated. Instead of listening to what the media tells me about a place, I have experienced it myself, and gotten to know it my own way. I like what you said about body image too. I live in Paris part of the time and in the US the rest. I don’t care much how I look in Paris, I mean, I try to look stylish, but I find when I’m in the US I’m more obsessed with my body and how I look. It’s refreshing to live in another culture where body image doesn’t seem to be as big a deal. I did gain 20 pounds (how did that happen?!) since being in France, so I guess I wasn’t paying enough attention to my body image! But at the same time it was refreshing.

    Thanks for the awesome post!

    • DangerousBiz says:

      Thanks so much, Karina! Glad that this post struck a chord with you.

      (And yeah, what is up with gaining weight in Europe?? I put on nearly 10 pounds traveling there this past summer/autumn…)

      • I eat too much bread. I live across from an amazing bakery, so I was tempted one too many times. Even when I overcame my addiction, I was still heavy and couldnt lose it, despite the fact I never take the escalator and climb all the metro stairs AND run nearly every day for an hour. Ugh! So frustrating!
        Karina@Jet Set Karina recently posted..Great story on Free Range Humans

  24. Karina, maybe all that French wine and cheese? =)
    There’s definitely something sexy about a woman with confidence. Met my now-wife while traveling, actually – it was funny that an American and a Canadian had to end up in South Korea to find each other…
    Chris @ One Weird Globe recently posted..FREE: 1 day sampler itinerary for Bangkok

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

CommentLuv badge

202 Flares Twitter 66 Facebook 49 Google+ 0 StumbleUpon 85 Pin It Share 2 202 Flares ×